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Teaching Faculty

2020-2021

Richard Kraut

Richard Kraut

rkraut1@northwestern.edu
Richard Kraut is the Charles and Emma Morrison Professor in the Humanities. He holds appointments in the Departments of Philosophy and Classics. Having received his Ph.D. from Princeton University, he taught at the University of Illinois at Chicago before moving to Northwestern in 1995.  His interests include contemporary moral and political philosophy, as well as the ethics and political thought of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. Outside of academia, he tries his hand at the piano and tennis, and enjoys novels, plays, opera, and chamber music.

Kyla Ebels-Duggan

Kyla Ebels-Duggan

kebelsduggan@northwestern.edu
Kyla Ebels-Duggan is Associate Professor of Philosophy in the Department of Philosophy.  She works on issues in moral and political philosophy.  Recently, some of her work has focused on the intersection of these areas with questions in the philosophy of education.  She is interested in how to understand the interaction between our responsibility for children we raise and their responsibility for themselves, where to locate authority and responsibility for communicating value commitments to the next generation, the sense in which parents and educators ought to aim to foster autonomy, and the role of articulating reasons in moral education and development.  She is also interested in the implications of the answers to these questions for broader issues in moral psychology, value theory, and political philosophy. 

Laura Martin

Laura Martin

laura.martin2@northwestern.edu
Laura Martin is the Postdoctoral Fellow in the Brady Scholars Program and Department ofPhilosophy. She received her PhD in Philosophy from Columbia University in 2020. Herareas of specialization are social and political philosophy, feminist philosophy, and FrankfurtSchool Critical Theory. Her recent research focuses on the nature of social reality. Inparticular, she is interested in how we both create and come to be constrained by structuralforms of oppression, and what this reveals about human agency. Her other philosophicalinterests include the concept of the public sphere, how processes of commodification andobjectification change our understanding of ourselves and others, and the nature of socialcritique.

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